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“Belichick, having always subscribed to the philosophy that it’s time to go …” Wickersham wrote.

Bill Belichick was the New York Giants' defensive coordinator from 1985 to 1990, and he may be considering filling the team's head coaching vacancy amid a reported rift between Belichick, New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady and owner Robert Kraft.

The New York Daily News' Gary Myers spoke to a source who said Belichick "sees an opening" to coach the Giants and that this offseason "is his last chance" to take the job.

ESPN's Seth Wickersham reported Friday that Belichick had grown frustrated in New England, particularly with the team's decision to trade Jimmy Garoppolo to the San Francisco 49ers in October.

Wickersham detailed a meeting in which Kraft essentially demanded Belichick trade Garoppolo, and sources described the coach as "furious and demoralized" after the meeting.

"Belichick, having always subscribed to the philosophy that it's time to go once an owner gets involved in football decisions, left the impression with some friends that the current dynamic was unsustainable," Wickersham wrote.

The Patriots released a statement on behalf of Belichick, Brady and Kraft to refute Wickersham's report:

Even after the Patriots' supposed dirty laundry was aired out in public, the odds Belichick would leave the Patriots to coach the Giants seem remote.

Moving to New York would allow Belichick to bring his career full circle. While he coached elsewhere before joining the Giants in 1979, his career took off in the Big Apple, where he worked alongside Bill Parcells.

Leaving emotion aside, little about the change would make sense.

Belichick turns 66 in April and would be inheriting a team that may need a new starting quarterback in 2018. Even if the Giants make Eli Manning the starter next season, Belichick would essentially have the same dilemma he's dealing with in New England with Brady in the twilight of his career.

There's also the logistical question as to whether the Giants could feasibly wait until the Patriots' postseason is over to pursue Belichick.

Although it's relatively common for assistant coaches to look at new jobs in the middle of the playoffs, it's highly doubtful Belichick would do anything—such as interviewing with another team—to directly interrupt his team's preparations.

In that case, the Giants would lose out on qualified candidates in the belief they're keeping the seat warm for Belichick. And in the event Belichick stayed in New England, the Giants would be left scrambling to find a new coach.

Of course, some will argue the chance to hire one of the best coaches in NFL history is more than worth the risk.


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