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Las Vegas close to getting second NASCAR Cup race

With the NHL moving to Las Vegas and the Raiders trying to make the switch, Sin City is close to becoming one the favorite destinations for the sports world.Las Vegas could also be getting second NASCAR Cup race a deal is approved by the city's tourism board next week.

The Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority has scheduled a meeting Wednesday to consider a seven-year, $2.5 million annual sponsorship agreement with NASCAR.The proposed deal, which could give Las Vegas a fall race beginning in 2018, consists of a $1 million sponsorship fee for each Cup race weekend plus a $500,000 marketing fee. 

NASCAR isn't going to increase the number of races — including non-points events — next season, so if the proposal is approved it likely means race realignment from within Speedway Motorsports Inc. which owns the following speedways:

 Atlanta, Bristol, Charlotte, Kentucky, New Hampshire, Sonoma and Texas.Only two races at SMI races occur in the fall — New Hampshire in September and Charlotte in October. Las Vegas' 1.5-mile track currently hosts a spring NASCAR Cup event. This year it's the Kobalt 400 on March 12 but another could be coming and one of the sport's best doesn't mind. "I love Vegas and I think it's a great sponsor," Kevin Harvick said, via ESPN.com. "I think it would be good.

 But sometimes you can turn one great [race] into two mediocres. That's just something you have to be careful of and look at and really evaluate.

"Vegas is a great place to race. I enjoy going there. If it did wind up with a second race, I would be fine with that, but I would be cautious to look at a California-type situation where you have one great event that we had there and when we had two, it wasn't so great.

"According to Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority's meeting material, last year's March race attracted 96,400 out-of-town visitors resulting in a $139.2 million economic impact.


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